Wednesday, December 8, 2021

Global rush for electric cars risk replacing the last century’s scramble for fossil fuels – Buhari

President Muhammadu Buhari has warned that the global rush for electric cars risks replacing the last century’s scramble for fossil fuels with a new global race in lithium found in Africa, thereby, endangering geopolitical stability.

The President disclosed this in a statement on Sunday before he jetted off for the 26th Conference of Parties (COP26) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

He added that without extra and stable power, we cannot build the factories that will transform Africa from a low-job, extractives-led economy to a high employment middle-income continent

President Buhari stated that mankind has a duty to act on fixing climate change issues, urging that access to low-cost and reliable energy is the highest of all possible concerns as Nigeria is projected to have the second-highest population in the world by 2100.

He said, “Dire warnings of the end of the world are as old as civilization itself. But each year as the countdown to United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP) begins, they grow in volume and intensity.

“Recently, senior United Nations officials raised the alarm of “world conflict and chaos” and mass migrations and institutional collapse should greenhouse gas emissions remain unchecked for much longer.”

He urged that mankind has a duty to act on these dangers, but however, warned that the nature of the seriousness means we must not do so rashly as it is an inconvenient truth, but energy solutions proposed by those most eager to address the climate crisis are fuel for the instability of which they warn.

“For today’s 1.3 billion Africans, access to low-cost and reliable energy is the highest of all possible concerns. Estimated to rise to 2.5 billion by 2050—by 2100 Nigeria alone is projected to have the second largest population on the planet—this “great doubling” (for Nigeria, quadrupling) has the right to more dependable electricity than their forebears.

“Without extra and stable power, we cannot build the factories that will transform Africa from a low-job, extractives-led economy to a high employment middle-income continent. Children cannot learn for longer and better by battery light any more than by candlelight. No more than the Africa of today, the Africa of tomorrow cannot advance using energy production that intermittently delivers.

“The most fashionable of modern energy technologies, are flawed by their reliance on back-up diesel generators or batteries for when there is no wind for the turbines or sun for the panels,” he stated.

He also warned that the global rush for electric cars risks replacing the last century’s scramble for fossil fuels with a new global race in lithium for batteries.

“Where significant deposits are to be found, such as in Africa, this could endanger geopolitical stability. This makes the economic migrations the U.N. warned of more likely. We must think carefully whether our dash to terminate the use of fossil fuels so swiftly is as wise as it sounds.

“There is no single “green bullet” that can be deployed either in Africa or the world that solves concerns of environmentalists while simultaneously offering the power to fuel hope of greater wealth and progress for the extra 1 billion citizens of our African future.”

 

We would like to keep you updated with special notifications.